Sinopia Biosciences Awarded Second NHLBI Phase II SBIR

Sinopia Biosciences received a second Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) branch of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support research and commercialization of transfusion products. Titled "Improving the safety and efficacy of platelet transfusion through systems biology", the award for approximately $1.5 million will support the deployment of Sinopia's platform for platelet transfusion products. In Phase I, Sinopia’s systems biology platform discovered biochemical alterations in platelet metabolism over time through comprehensive metabolite profiling and computational analyses. This Phase II grant focuses on testing novel additives to combat the metabolic changes in order to better preserve cells for transfusion and potentially extend the shelf life of platelet products. The multi-center project will strengthen existing key collaborations with the San Diego Blood Bank and blood metabolomics experts at the University of Colorado Denver.

Sinopia Biosciences Awarded NIGMS Phase I SBIR

Sinopia Biosciences, a computational biology company in San Diego, received a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS). Entitled "Developing a systems biology platform for predicting drug toxicity and safety", the award will allow Sinopia to expand its therapeutic safety platform to a large number of pharmaceuticals and types of drug side effects. The award is for approximately $190,000.

Multi-site investigation validates metabolic biomarkers for assessing RBC unit age

Research at Sinopia Biosciences analyzing metabolomics data previously revealed a three state, non-linear decay of red blood cells during storage. A new study published in the prestigious hematology journal, Blood, shows that with the measurement of just eight metabolites, the RBC storage age can be accurately predicted. Unlike previous studies, the investigation involved multiple sites, as well as different additive solutions, processing methods, and analytical setups for metabolite measurement. The success of the study is an independent confirmation of two separate laboratories and further validates the three state decay of red blood cells during blood bank storage. The work was completed by researchers from EURAC Research in Italy, the University of Colorado Denver, the University of Iceland, the Blood Bank at Landspitali-University Hospital, and Sinopia Biosciences.

Early View Publication

Sinopia Biosciences Awarded $1.5 million NHLBI Phase II SBIR

Sinopia Biosciences received a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) branch of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Titled "Improving red blood cell transfusion through systems biology", the award for approximately $1.5 million will support the experimental deployment of Sinopia's platform for transfusion medicine. In Phase I, Sinopia’s systems biology platform discovered a non-linear decay process for red blood cell storage and how the cell’s metabolism changes over time. The detected changes were shown to have potential clinical relevance. This Phase II grant focuses on testing novel additives to combat the metabolic changes in order to better preserve red blood cells for transfusion. The multi-center project will involve key collaborations with the San Diego Blood Bank and blood metabolomics experts at the University of Colorado Denver.

Sinopia researchers show promise of RBC metabolic state as diagnostic for cell quality

Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is an integral part of health care. Many scientific studies have shown that biochemical and physiological changes occur during longer storage periods of RBCs. In the past decade, there has been fervent interest for whether or not "old" RBCs have a clinical impact on patient outcomes. Several observational and randomized clinical trials have been completed with mixed results. 

Throughout this process and debate, there has been no quantitative metric for what constitutes "old" and "fresh" RBCs. In an Early View in the journal Transfusion, Sinopia Biosciences researchers, collaborating with scientists and transfusion clinicians from the University of Iceland, University of Copenhagen, Technical University of Denmark, Reykjavik University, and Landspitali Hospital, define such a metric. This metric allows for future clinical studies to be better standardized and for future scientific studies to have clear quantitative outcomes to measure up to.

Specifically, RBCs were profiled using comprehensive metabolomics over the course of storage and modeling techniques were used to determine metabolic pathway activities. The metabolic activity was found to correlate with clinical outcomes and markers linked with endothelial damage. Surprisingly, traditional metrics of RBC storage quality, including those currently used for quality control and regulatory processes, were not as accurate as the discovered metabolic metric.

This work was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and European Research Council.

Full publication

Sinopia scientists construct personalized models for determining personalized side effects

While at UC San Diego, Sinopia scientists and colleagues constructed personalized models to determine personalized side effects based on patients' blood samples. The study was basd on genomic and metabolomics data obtained from blood samples of 24 individuals. Researchers used these data to build a personalized, predictive model for each individual. Researchers then used these predictive models to understand why some individuals experienced side effects to ribavirin. The work was published in Cell Systems on October 28, 2015. 

See also, UC San Diego press release and GEN News Highlight

Sinopia Biosciences Awarded NHLBI Phase I SBIR

Sinopia Biosciences, a small biotechnology company in San Diego, received a second Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) branch of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The award for approximately $220,000 will support the expansion and further development of Sinopia's bioinformatics and systems biology platform for transfusion medicine. This particular grant focuses on extending work on the platform for studying the metabolic consequences of the platelet storage legion.

Sinopia Biosciences to Present at AABB 2014

Sinopia Biosciences will be attending and presenting two talks at the AABB (American Association of Blood Banks) Annual Meeting 2014. The meeting will be held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on October 25-28, 2014.

Dr. Bernhard Palsson, Ph.D. will be presenting a talk during the "Hot Topic" session titled "O' Mice and Men - Genetic Insights into RBC Metabolomics and a Systems Analysis Approach" on October 25th.

Dr. Aarash Bordbar, Ph.D. will be presenting an oral abstract titled: "Systems biology analysis of stored red blood cells in SAGM reveals three distinct metabolic states" on October 28th.

Sinopia Biosciences Awarded NHLBI Phase I SBIR

Sinopia Biosciences (CHOmics Inc.), a small biotechnology company in San Diego, received a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) branch of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The award for approximately $150,000 will support the development of bioinformatic methods and systems biology models of human erythrocytes to study the metabolic consequences of the red blood cell (RBC) storage lesion accumulated during RBC storage.